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Posts Tagged ‘Bishop NT Wright’

Revelation and Christian Hope: Political Implications of the Revelation to John from Duke Divinity School on Vimeo.

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If Easter makes any sense at all, it makes sense within something much more like the classic Jewish worldview: heaven and earth are neither the same thing, nor a long way removed from one another, but they overlap and interlock mysteriously in a number of ways; and the God who made both heaven and earth is at work from within the world as well as from without, sharing the pain of the world – indeed, taking its full weight upon his own shoulders. From this point of view, as the Eastern Orthodox churches have always emphasized, when Jesus rose again, God’s whole new creation emerged from the tomb, introducing a world full of new potential and possibility. Indeed, precisely because part of that new possibility is for human beings to be revived and renewed, the resurrection of Jesus does not leave us passive, helpless spectators. We find ourselves lifted up, set on our feet, given new breath in our lungs, and commissioned to go and make new creation happen in the world.

— NT Wright in Surprised by Hope

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The Anglican Communion Institute has released Anglicanism: A Gift in Christ, a two-set DVD series designed for adult education purposes. The set is composed of a series of talks given by renowned Anglican scholars and pastors. With Sunday morning or weeknight parish education sessions in mind, each lecture covers a key facet of Anglican faith and life: Bishop N.T. Wright on the New Testament, Dr. Jo Bailey Wells on the Old Testament, Dr. Edith Humphrey on Anglican hymnody, Dr. George Sumner on parish renewal, Dr. Ephraim Radner on mission, Dr. Philip Turner on Christian ethics, Bishop Anthony Burton on the prayer book, Bishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon of Nigeria on the church in the Muslim world, and former Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey on the Anglican Communion, among others.

The entire series is full of such insights, and much more could be gleaned from its many lectures. It all comes back around, in the end, to the classical Anglican vision of a people formed by God though common worship, common prayer, and common reading of the Scriptures, growing together in wisdom, holiness, and love, and sent out into the world to witness to the gospel of Christ. Anyone seeking to deepen their understanding of the Anglican tradition, in order to better reach out in mission to the Church and the world, would do well to study this fine series.

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