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Posts Tagged ‘Archbishop Michael Ramsey’

Confronted with a universe more terrible than ever in the blindness and the destructiveness of its potentialities, men and women must be led to Christian faith, not as a panacea of progress or as an otherworldly solution unrelated to history, but as a gospel of Transfiguration. Such a gospel transcends the world and yet speaks directly to the immediate here-and-now. He who is transfigured is the Son of Man; and as he discloses on the holy mountain another world, he reveals that no part of created things, and no moment of created time lies outside the power of the Spirit, who is Lord, to change it from glory to glory. (The Gory of God and the Transfiguration of Christ, p. 147)

From Into the Expectation

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As of November of 2009, Archbishop Michael Ramsey’s classic book The Gospel and The Catholic Church is back in print with a new introduction by the Rev. Dr. Arnold Klukas, a professor at Nashotah House seminary.  It would be hard for me to recommend this book highly enough, and it is on my must read list for all Anglicans.  It is a very readable but thorough look at how closely knit together a Biblical account of the church (including the episcopacy) and the gospel actually are.

From the Amazon product description:

This reissue of Archbishop Ramsey’s classic theological study of Anglican views of the church is important for students of ecumenism, and for those concerned with the relationship between Christ and the church in the New Testament. Although some of the book is dated, its conviction that “the church’s meaning lies in its fulfillment of the sufferings of Christ” and that “every part of its history is intelligible in terms of the Passion” remains perceptive and challenging.

Examining Scripture, doctrine, and history, Ramsey paints an intricate portrait of the church as an example of Christ’s death and resurrection. He explores Eastern orthodox doctrine; explains the purposes and preconditions of the Reformation; and calls for a renewal of liturgical worship and reconciliation within the communion of the saints.Originally published in 1936 while he was serving as sub-warden of Lincoln Theological College, this was Ramsey’s first book. After more than seventy years, its wisdom concerning the relationship between Catholic and Evangelical, and the underlying complementarities and tensions which characterize the Anglican tradition, remains theologically sound and biblically astute.

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